SDHsig.gif (4600 bytes)V8OilAnalysis.gif (1423 bytes)iconOil.jpg (6329 bytes)

January 2006 update

I haven't sent an engine oil sample to the lab for a few years. I didn't think there was much value in it anymore for me after establishing a trend in my engine. All the oils were satisfactory and performed well within acceptable limits. This lab analysis was to determine if there was any measurable effect on the engine by changing the air filter. Could I measure a difference in airborne dirt passed by the air filter and into the engine oil and would this effect any of the wear metals? Oil used for this 5000 km stint was Penrite HPR10, a 10W-50 oil. This is the "recommended" oil for the 1JZGTE and 1UZ-FE. I got it because it's cheap, easily available, correct weight and will easily survive 5000km in my engine.

Oil Analyses Elements are quantified in the oil at part per million levels (PPM). This list shows the most common sources of the elements in a gasoline or diesel engine oil.

Aluminum : Pistons, bearings, cases (heads & blocks).
Chromium: Rings, a trace element in steel.
Iron : Cylinders, rotating shafts, the valve train, and any steel part sharing the oil.
Copper: Brass or bronze parts, copper bushings, bearings, oil coolers, also an additive in some gasoline engine oils.
Lead: Bearings.
Tin: Bearings, bronze parts, piston coatings.
Molybdenum : Anti-wear additive, coating on some new rings
(washes off as break-in occurs).
Nickel: Trace element in steel.
Manganese : Trace element, additive in gasoline.
Silver: Trace element.
Titanium: Trace element.
Potassium : Antifreeze inhibitor, additive in some oil types.
Boron: Detergent/dispersing additive, antifreeze inhibitors.
Silicon : Airborne dirt, sealers, gaskets, antifreeze inhibitors.
Sodium: Antifreeze inhibitors, additive in some gasoline engine oils.
Calcium : Detergent/dispersing additive.
Magnesium: Detergent/dispersing additive.
Phosphorus: Anti-wear additive.
Zinc: Anti-wear additive.
Barium : Detergent/dispersing additive.

Physical properties:  Viscosity, flashpoint, % fuel and antifreeze, % water and insolubles are all measured in gasoline and diesel engine oils. If fuel is present in the oil, the viscosity and flashpoint will often be lower than what was stated in the "Should be" line. Insolubles are solid material that is centrifuged out of the oil. They are typically free carbon from the oxidation of the oil itself, along with blow-by past the rings.

hpr10.gif (13736 bytes)

 

Toyota 1UZ-FE V8 engine oil analysis

DATE SAMPLED

12-Jul-01

15-Feb-02

5-Mar-02

5-Apr-02

2-Jul-02

20-Sep-02

9-Nov-02

25-Jan-03

4-Apr-03

1-Nov-04

MACHINE (km)

76,000

81,000

86,000

90,100

95,930

100,032

105,000

111,080

114,250

146000

OIL (km)

Japan

5,000

4,500

4,500

5,830

4,070

5,000

6,000

3,170

5000

OIL MAKE (Km)

?

Penrite HPR 15

Shell Helix Plus

Havoline Energy

Castrol Magnatec

Mobil 1

Mobil 1

ULX-110

ULX-110

Penrite HPR 10

Oil type

?

Semi Synthetic

Semi Synthetic

Semi Synthetic

Semi Synthetic

Full Syn

Full Syn

Mineral

Mineral

Semi Synthetic

OIL GRADE

?

15W-60

15W50

5W30

10W30

5W50

5W50

10W30

20W30

10W-50

OIL ADDED (litres)

?

0

0

0

0

0

0

0.6

0.5

0

FILTER

?

Ryco

Ryco

Ryco

Toyota

FSA

FSA

Ryco

Ryco

Ryco

Wear Metals (ppm)

Iron (Fe)

4

9

6

9

14

13

10

13

10

4

Aluminium (AI)

2

2

2

<1

6

5

6

18

21

<1

Copper (Cu)

2

3

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

<1

Chromium (Cr)

<1

<1

<1

<1

1

1

1

<1

<1

<1

Lead (Pb)

1

8

4

5

6

7

10

11

<1

2

Tin (Sn)

1

<1

<1

<1

1

1

1

<1

<1

<1

Other Metals/Additives (ppm)

Molybdenum (Mo)

287

28

25

760

94

164

153

826

970

4

Zinc (Zn)

1140

922

960

1044

960

1223

1335

1051

1040

989

Phosphorus (P)

967

798

813

896

835

1053

1135

1660

907

Potassium (K)

1

8

19

5

3

2

1

1

1

<1

Magnesium (Mg)

450

80

42

21

283

553

583

19

218

Calcium (Ca)

2137

2770

2876

2032

1953

2360

2883

2412

2471

2135

Manganese (Mn)

<1

1

4

124

9

n/a

n/a

Contaminants (ppm)

Water (.6 by FTIR)

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

Silicon (Si)

11

12

9

7

13

13

11

15

15

3

Boron (B)

85

5

17

5

69

134

137

5

241

12

Sodium (Na)

4

6

5

7

49

4

<1

15

5

<1

Physical Tests

Viscosity (cSt,40C)

111

139

121

62

104

103

100

84.6

119

Viscosity (cSt,100C)

13

17.8

Glycol Index

0.1

0.5

0.4

<0.1

0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<1

PQ Index

41

39

32

34

49

77

47

13

18

13

Nitration Index

10.9

10.4

10

10.9

11.4

12.4

11.7

11

10

5

Petrol (.6 by Distillation)

1.5

2

1.5

1

1.5

2

1.5

3

1.2

Si:Al ratio

5.5

6

4.5

7

2.17

2.6

1.83

0.83

0.71 >3

 

Engine problems predicted with oil analysis.

Indicator Acceptable Levels Engine Problem What to Check

Silicon (Si) and
Aluminum (Al)
10 to 30 ppm Dirt ingestion Air intake system, oil filter plugging, oil filler cap and breather, valve covers, oil supply
Iron (Fe) 100 to 200 ppm Wear of cylinder liner, valve and gear train, oil pump, rust in system Excessive oil consumption, abnormal engine noise,performance problems, oil pressure, abnormal operating temperatures, stuck/broken piston rings
Chromium (CR) 10 to 30 ppm Piston ring wear Excessive oil blow-by and oil consumption, oil degradation
Copper (CU) 10 to 50 ppm Bearings and bushings wear, oil cooler passivating,radiator corrosion Coolant in engine oil, abnormal noise when operating at near stall speed
Lead (Pb)* 40 to 100 ppm Bearing corrosion Extended oil change intervals
Copper (CU) and
Lead (Pb)*
10 to 50 ppm Bearing lining wear Oil pressure, abnormal engine noise, dirt being ingested in air intake, fuel dilution, extended oil drain intervals
Aluminum (Al) 10 to 30 ppm Piston and piston thrust bearing wear Blow-by gases, oil consumption, power loss, abnormal engine noise
Silver and
Tin
2 to 5 ppm
10 to 30 ppm
Wear of bearings Excessive oil consumption, abnormal engine noise, loss in oil pressure
Viscosity Change
Lack of lubrication Fuel dilution, blow-by gases, oil oxidation, carburetor choke, ignition timing, injectors, injector pump, oil pressure
Water/Anti-freeze
Coolant leak or condensation Coolant supply, gasket sealed, hose connection, oil filler cap and breather

So checking the Silicon values as an indicator of air intake leaks:

silicon.jpg (43448 bytes)

The silicon levels in the oil are satisfactory. So no warning bells about the TRD air filter here. There are several web pages regarding the filtering efficiency of various filters. For example http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/airfilter/airtest3.htm . I didn't do this sort of test. I wanted to measure the effect on the engine directly from different filters by engine oil analysis.

Checking the wear metals next:

Clip_3.gif (50161 bytes)

The wear metals are also still satisfactory. The TRD air filter is satisfactory for my engine. I wouldn't mind doing another test to see if these low values continue. This does not mean that the TRD filter has out performed the other filters. The differing values also reflect the chemistry of the different brands of oil and their own approach. Because the brand of oil has been changed as well as the filter it is not possible to compare one air filter to another

Clip_4.gif (41268 bytes)

Silicon/aluminum ratio in dirt varies by location - The primary constituents of dirt are minerals containing silicon and aluminum. The ratio of these two elements varies widely from place to place. Clay soils contain nearly as much aluminum as silicon. This is one reason why local interpretation of  results is important.   Silica and alumina are typically present in dirt and dust in the approximate ratio 3.4:1, with silica being the major component and alumina the minor component. Spectrometric analysis of oil samples that contain high levels of dirt and dust typically reflect this ratio of silica to alumina in the ppm of silicon and aluminum measured. It would appear that there is a relationship between silicon and aluminium in my engine oil. Silicon goes up, aluminium goes up, silicon goes down, aluminium goes down. This sort of relationship indicates dirt ingress. The odd ones out are the two ULX-110 engine oil samples. These are the only two samples where the aluminium is higher than the silicon. ULX-110 add silicon and aluminium to new oil as part of an additive package and so do not reflect extra dirt ingress or wear metals compared to the other samples. Long term trends are more important than absolute limits.

"What are the elements I should look for in elemental analysis to detect dust and dirt contamination of my lubricants?"

Solid particles are one of the most destructive contaminants. Dust and dirt getting into the reservoirs from the environment and poor lubrication practices are the most common source of surface damage and wear. Maintaining lubricants free of dirt is a smart proactive action that can significantly increase the life of your machinery.

Consider this: silicon (Si) is an indicator of dirt in our lubricants. The earth's outer layer, is 4 to 60 kilometers thick. The crust, as this layer is known, is rich in oxygen and silica with lesser amounts of aluminum, iron, calcium, potassium, sodium and magnesium.

Average composition of the earth's crust:

SiO2 - 58.09%

AlO3 - 15.35%

FeO3 - 7.29%

Ca - 3.6%

Na - 2.97%

K - 2.57%

Mg - 2.11%

This indicates that the predominant elements are silicon (Si) and aluminum (Al). Keep in mind, however, that not all the places in the world will have the same metals in the same proportion. (source http://www.lube-tips.com )

 

 

trd1.jpg (71531 bytes)

Part number looks to be 17801 - JA810 (Japanese ?) or 17801-002 for V6 Tacoma/4 runner - I'm not positive about that number.

DSC00391.JPG (18056 bytes)

In Australia check with James Sloane (ring toll free on 1800 111 388 or NSW on 02 8831 8831) Castle Hill Toyota Parts in NSW for your special price. He can post one out to you no problems.

We have done some testing on different types of panel filters in the Toyota Soarer here. So for me I'll be leaving my TRD filter in full-time. I'm just extra careful not to damage it while cleaning  by squirting it with the hose or blowing it with compressed air when cleaning. Nice and gentle does it.

 

May 2003 update

Got a warning from the Castrol Oil Analysis lab with my 2nd ULX-110 sample - "small amount of contaminants indicated" - this may well indicate the chemistry of the ULX-110 as they add silicon and aluminium to their new oil. All results were acceptable for the 2nd ULX-110 sample. Even more moly in this sample and the boron is through the roof. Same ULX oil - just the thicker 20W this time - previously it was the 10W oil - I have never heard of so much molybdenum in an oil sample before.  After switching back to the Toyota filter I see if I can get a oiled cotton or foam filter to try - see if it affects the contaminants.

April 2003 update

Use full syn for the TT, a quality 10w approx for the V8, change oil and filter every 5000km or 3000 miles

02012206.jpg (26132 bytes)

Left to right in the little jars: Old ULX, new ULX, new Mobil 1, old Mobil 1. Different colours when new, same icky brown/black after 5000 odd kms.

Had a big jump in aluminium with the ULX-110 (it's an additive). Still acceptable. The viscosity of ULX - it is thinner than Mobil 1, thicker than Havoline. Energy.  ULX has the highest molybdenum content I have ever seen in an oil - higher than Havoline. Energy. Results in table below. Second lot of ULX has been drained and is off to the lab. Shell Helix Ultra 5W-50 is now in the car, I mean if it's good enough for a Ferrari then it should be ok for my beloved Soarer! I wanted a thinner oil full syn oil that would easily cope with 60 laps of Phillip Island with the foot mashed to the floor and the 10 hour drive home.

AND you can't get oils that don't mix any more. So you can go from mineral to full syn and back - the oil won't curdle or thicken. Old engines may use and leak more oil of a lower viscosity compared to a thicker oil.

AmsoilULXMOBIL.gif (8528 bytes)

Check the above graph. Aaron and I did a dyno before and after the oil change. This isn't any big budget affair - I changed the oil in the carpark while Aaron warmed up the cars and circulated the new oil before a dyno. It was old (5000-6000km) Mobil 1 versus new oil - not new versus new. Lot's of things weren't very scientific about the test we know. Anyway Aaron's graphs are the red and orange. I have picked out two dyno graphs that give the impression that Amsoil makes more power than Mobil 1. I have also changed the power scale so it doesn't start at zero - it starts at 60 - this makes changes appear bigger.

The light blue and dark blue lines are my car. I have modified exhaust cams - that may explain why my car appears to keep making power longer than Aaron's - our rear tyres are similar in diameter. Looking at the graphs it would also appear that I get more power from the the new ULX than the Mobil. Perhaps-  but when you look at all the graphs below there isn't much in it. In fact when Aaron and I were watching the graphs on the screen live being overlayed - we reckoned there wasn't anything in it at all. Aaron had bigger variations the first time around. He was mucking around with a Apexi SAFC - got the fuel mixtures right - didn't affect power that much on the V8 - he has sold the SAFC now.

UZZ32power.gif (7471 bytes)

Here are all the graphs on my car with the full scale. Two runs before and two runs after the ULX oil change. Not much in it is there? Depends on which graphs you take as to which story you want to push. If you look at the times of the dyno you can see how long it took Aaron and I to do it. ULX said to me to flush oil with Mineral first since I have full syn Mobil 1. So I had to do two changes before the next dyno lying on my back on hot asphalt carpark.

So all up ULX did not make more power in my V8, it did not protect my V8 any better or worse.

Aaronamosil.gif (10518 bytes)

Here are all of Aaron's graphs. He changed from Mobil 1 to Amsoil. The car was all over the place and got better with every run. I couldn't really say that new Amsoil is better than old Mobil 1 in Aaron's car either - the data is too sketchy. It does look better in places but we didn't get a consistent baseline - the car kept improving - it might have been the same without the oil change. We haven't analysed the oil in Aaron's engine. Since Amsoil is hard to get and dearer than Mobil 1 he won't be using it again.

So here ends our foray into the boutique oils - I'm going back to the Majors - I reckon after the Ultra it's time to revisit Shell Helix Plus.

wearmetalsarpil03.gif (8254 bytes)

SAMPLE STATUS

Normal

Normal

Normal

Normal

Normal

Normal

Normal

LAB CHECK NO.

5073910

5210092

5210345

5210098

5226943

1341609

1341610

20030331-0301

20030428-0201 In the car now

ANALYSIS NO.

3026395

3048427

3058671

3058672

3069363

1560356

156115

DATE SAMPLED

12-Jul-01

15-Feb-02

5-Mar-02

5-Apr-02

2-Jul-02

20-Sep-02

9-Nov-02

25-Jan-03

4-Apr-03

DATE RECEIVED

16-Jul-01

18-Feb-02

21-May-02

21-May-02

15-Jul-02

15-Dec-02

2-Dec-02

31-Mar-03

28-Apr-03

DATE REPORTED

16-Jul-01

19-Feb-02

22-May-02

22-Feb-02

15-Jul-02

10/12/02

4/12/02

31-Mar-03

28-Apr-03

MACHINE (Kms)

76,000

81,000

86,000

90,100

95,930

100,032

105,000

111,080

114,250

OIL (Kms)

Japan

5,000

4,500

4,500

5,830

4,070

5,000

6,000

3,170

OIL MAKE (Kms)

Japan

Penrite HPR 15

Helix Plus

Havoline Energy

Castrol Magnatec

Mobil 1

Mobil 1

ULX-110

ULX-110

Shell Ultra

Oil type

Semi Synthetic

Semi Synthetic

Semi Synthetic

Semi Syn

Full Syn

Full Syn

Mineral

Mineral

Full Syn

OIL GRADE (Ltrs)

Japan

15W-60

15W50

5W30

10W30

5W50

5W50

10W30

20W30

5W-50

OIL ADDED (Kms)

Japan

0

0

0

0

0

0

0.6

0.5

FILTER (Kms)

Japan

Ryco

Ryco

Ryco

Toyota

FSA

FSA

Ryco

Ryco

Ryco

Wear Metals (ppm)

Iron (Fe)

4

9

6

9

Iron (Fe)

14

13

10

13

10

Aluminium (AI)

2

2

2

<1

Aluminium (AI)

6

5

6

18

21

Copper (Cu)

2

3

1

1

Copper (Cu)

2

1

1

1

1

Chromium (Cr)

<1

<1

<1

<1

Chromium (Cr)

1

1

1

<1

<1

Lead (Pb)

1

8

4

5

Lead (Pb)

6

7

10

11

<1

Tin (Sn)

1

<1

<1

<1

Tin (Sn)

1

1

1

<1

<1

Other Metals (ppm)

Molybdenum (Mo)

287

28

25

760

Molybdenum (Mo)

94

164

153

826

970

Zinc (Zn)

1140

922

960

1044

Zinc (Zn)

960

1223

1335

1051

1040

Phosphorus (P)

967

798

813

896

Phosphorus (P)

835

1053

1135

1660

Potassium (K)

1

8

19

5

Potassium (K)

3

2

1

1

1

Magnesium (Mg)

450

80

42

21

Magnesium (Mg)

283

553

583

19

Calcium (Ca)

2137

2770

2876

2032

Calcium (Ca)

1953

2360

2883

2412

2471

Manganese (Mn)

<1

1

4

124

Manganese (Mn)

9

n/a

n/a

Contaminants (ppm)

Water (.6 by FTIR)

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

Water (.6 by FTIR)

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

Silicon (Si)

11

12

9

7

Silicon (Si)

13

13

11

15

15

Boron (B)

85

5

17

5

Boron (B)

69

134

137

5

241

Sodium (Na)

4

6

5

7

Sodium (Na)

49

4

<1

15

5

Physical tests

Viscosity (cSt,40C)

111

139

121

62

Viscosity (cSt,40C)

104

103

100

84.6

Viscosity (cSt,100C) Viscosity (cSt,100C) 13

Glycol Index

0.1

0.5

0.4

<0.1

Glycol Index

0.1

<0.1

<0.1

<0.1

PQ Index

41

39

32

34

PQ Index

49

77

47

13

18

Nitration Index

10.9

10.4

10

10.9

Nitration Index

11.4

12.4

11.7

11

10

Petrol (.6 by Distillation)

1.5

2

1.5

1

Petrol (.6 by Distillation)

1.5

2

1.5

3

Si:Al ratio

5.5

6

4.5

7

Si:Al ratio

2.17

2.60

1.83

0.83

0.83

updated Friday 17th January 2003

Two Mobil 1 oil analyses are back. The Mobil 1 did not protect the engine any better than any other oil over 5000 km. I don't care that the oil may have lasted longer - the crud still builds up and the filter still gets blocked - so 5000 km it will always be for me. The Mobil has been swapped for ULX-110 - a mineral oil. Haven't been able to measure a difference due to different oil filters. The Mobil 1 tested viscosity appears to be thicker than the specs - this is odd.

updated Sunday 24th August 2002

Castrol Magnatec analysis is back. All the oils tested so far have a normal wear profile - so all are ok for the V8. Favourite oil so far would be the Havoline Energy.

Updated Monday 8th July 2002

Now includes results for Penrite HPR15, Shell Helix Plus and HAVOLINE Energy. Castrol Magnatec and  Mobil 1 are next. Lots of info about Mobil 1 included as well. Not all Mobil 1 products are the same.

Summary:
I use good quality Semi Synthetic oil for my V8 Soarer changed every 5000km (approx 3000 miles) with genuine Toyota oil filter changed at same time.
For the Twin Turbo go for full synthetic oil, still change every 5000 km with new genuine Toyota Filter.

I love anecdotal evidence such as "I only use Brand X air filters and when I tore down the motor there was no abnormal wear - it is a great filter." and " I have used Brand Y oil and have had no problems".

Getting an oil analysis will tell you how well your oil is protecting your engine and how much dirt is getting in (through the air filter for example) - nothing else will. So if you are presented with information about how well a filter filters or how good an oil is for your engine, don't decide straight away if the information is wrong or right, just file it away in the evidence section of your brain. An oil analysis done in your sort of car with your sort of driving in your sort of local climate conditions will be one of the strongest pieces of evidence you can get. Stronger again if done over a period of time with several changes of oil - the trends can be more important than the actual values.

I couldn't get one person to recommend synthetic oil for my V8. Not the Lexus service mechanic, not the Toyota guy, not the Dyno tune race guy. They all said the same thing - semi synthetic. 10 000 km intervals from Lexus/Toyota (Castrol TXT softec) and 5000km if your fussy from the race guy (Penrite HPR Pedigree Synthetic Fortified 15W/60).
Synthetic oil was recommended for the twin turbo engines.
How would I know if the oil was doing the job? There is only one way - getting the old oil analysed. I put some in a fruit juice bottle and gave it to my brother Andrew at MotorMate. He gave it to the Castrol rep who held it up to the light, smelt it, tagged it and took it away.
They now have me on file, each oil analysis is compared to the previous one and trends are plotted. They let me know how things are going.
I won't let them know what type of oil it is (well I do after the first couple of tests - I'm getting it for free still so the least I can do give them the brand of oil - I shouldn't really should I? - it is a Castrol Lab and strictly speaking to be impartial they shouldn't know the brand of oil until afterwards. They always ask. hmmmm) I want it to be a blind test. I change the oil every 5000 km.
I drained the hot oil over night with the car jacked up slightly higher on the battery side - this allowed the oil to drain completely to the sump plug on the throttle side (RHS) (V8). The oil filter was removed too.
I then fitted a new oil filter, refilled the oil, added the oil engine clean additive, ran for 30 mins and drained overnight again.
Then I refilled and replaced the oil filter again. 2 oil changes and 2 filters in 2 days was done only because I didn't know the oil history of the engine.

Now I just jack it up and let it drain for an hour.
The oil analysis is supposed to be real cheap - I don't know how cheap because my brother owns the autoparts store so they did it for him for free.
So if you are curious ask them - they might do the first one for free.

Oil Analysis report for my Soarer V8.

Semi Synthetic (15W-60) oil survived 5000 km in my car, some long trips interstate, lots of full throttle driving, sealed roads, warm summer, low humidity, 300m above sea level, genuine Toyota air filter. The oil that came with the car from Japan was ok too. Both samples got a "Normal" rating. There are no "Sweeet" or "Cool" ratings!

There are four ratings for the oil analysis, Normal, Caution, Abnormal and Severe. They've all been Normal so far.

 

 

Wear Metals (ppm)

Iron (Fe)

Gears, roller bearings, cylinder/liners, shafts

Aluminium (AI)

Pistons, journal bearings, dirt

Copper (Cu)

Brass/bronze bushes, gears, thrust washers, oil cooler cores, internal coolant leaks

Chromium (Cr)

Roller bearings, piston rings

Lead (Pb)

Journal bearings, grease, petrol contamination

Tin (Sn)

Bronze bushes, washers and gears

Other Metals (ppm)

Molybdenum (Mo)

oil additive, rings (Molybdenum DiThioCarbamate as a friction modifier)

Zinc (Zn)

Additive (antiwear)

Phosphorus (P)

Additive (antiwear, extreme pressure)

Potassium (K)

Magnesium (Mg)

Additive, sea water contamination

Calcium (Ca)

detergent additive

Manganese (Mn)

Contaminants (ppm)

Water (.6 by FTIR)

Silicon (Si)

Airborne dirt, sealers, gaskets, antifreeze inhibitors

Boron (B)

Additive, internal coolant leak, brake fluid contamination

Sodium (Na)

Internal coolant leaks, additive, sea water contamination

Viscosity (cSt,40C)

15W oils have higher viscosity than the 5W oils

Viscosity of Castrol Oils: GTX3 104, TXT softec 70, GTX Magnatec 105

Glycol Index

PQ Index

Particle Quantification Index - measure of the bulk magnetic content of oil (iron). I have low PQ and low Iron (ppm)   - normal wear profile.

Nitration Index

Petrol (.6 by Distillation)

Si:Al ratio

Ratio between 2 and 10 - ok

 

IF YOU HAVE ANY INQUIRIES, contact the Labcheck Laboratory on: BRISBANE: Tel (07) 3243 7200 Fax (07) 4234 7221 PERTH: Tel (08) 9249 2636 Fax (08) 9249 2942 SYDNEY: Tel (02) 8784 8666 Fax (02) 8784 8600 SINGAPORE: Tel (65) 743 4311 Fax (65) 283 9689

 



5l_pedigree.gif (10066 bytes) cost : $26  - just gone up since The oil that came in car from Japan (unknown) was tested and came up ok. Then I went for Penrite HPR Premium for $26. Recommended to me Keen Dyno - he reckons this oil is the go for for non-turbo cars. Oil analysis for this is above. Did 5000km on this oil. 5000 km is recommended no matter what, the engine may be dirty from unknown history, gets contaminated by fuel, water and dirt, and the additives get used up no matter how long the oil lasts, and the oil filter can get blocked and go to bypass mode. Doesn't matter how good the oil is or how long the oil lasts, change filter (at least) and oil every 5000 km - so full syn or not 5000 km is enough for me. Penrite recommend HPR 10 for the 1UZ-FE V8

An SAE 15W-60 semi-synthetic engine oil formulated for use in latest technology multivalve- multicam computer managed or conventional engines. Exceeds API SL/CF performance levels and those of ACEA A3/B3. Non friction modified. Primarily intended for: Petrol fuelled cars (including turbocharged); LPG fuelled cars. Can also be used in petrol and LPG fuelled four wheel drive recreational and light commercial vehicles (up to 3.5 t GVM) and diesel fuelled cars (including turbocharged). Meets the lubrication requirements of Porsche. For diesel fuelled four wheel drive recreational and light commercial vehicles, our primary recommendation is HPR Diesel 20W-60 or for new vehicles subjected to light work or for use in extreme cold, HPR Diesel Light 15W-40.


helixplus5l_15w_130.jpg (8760 bytes)

Cost: $28 roughly 

 

After the Penrite in went some Shell Helix Plus - only in for about 4500 km before the ALSC dyno day where it was changed for the Havoline. Shell recommend Shell Helix Ultra 15W-50 or Shell Helix Plus. About $28

Shell Helix Plus takes the worry out of choosing the right oil. Whatever your vehicle and however hard it is driven, Shell Helix Plus provides better protection than most conventional oils. That's why it meets nearly all handbook recommendations demanded by your vehicle manufacturer*. Shell Helix Plus is synthetic technology motor oil, which enables it to provide the highest levels of protection and performance. Available in 500ml, 1 litre and 5 litre


HavolineEnergy.jpg (10034 bytes)Cost: mid $40

 

 

At the ALSC dyno day I replaced the Shell Helix oil with HAVOLINE Energy and a new filter. I had read reports of a 6% fuel saving in independent magazine tests - on the dyno we got a 3 kW increase across the range - hardly a scientific test as the Shell Oil was already 4500 km old. This oil has done about 4500 km too before the oil change for the new camshafts. Cost about $40 only from Caltex service stations.

Caltex recommend HAVOLINE FORMULA 3 20W-50 or HAVOLINE FULLY SYNTHETIC

http://www.caltex.com.au/products_oil_detail.asp?id=99

 


Cost: hmmm, forget - mid $30's?

 

 

Castrol GTX Magnatec 10w40. I got it specifically because of the advertising about clinging to metal parts (ie new camshafts) - a big carrot for a donkey like me who wants his new camshafts to last and last! This is the oil recommended by Castrol for the 1UZ-FE V8 ($28). For the TT only full syn will do to cope with the turbo heat.

CASTROL GTX MAGNATEC
Features 'Unique Molecular Attraction' that provides total engine protection at start-up and warm-up by clinging to an engines crucial metal parts. Excellent low temperature flow also provides good fuel efficiency. Suitable for all engine types - petrol, diesel, gas, multivalve or turbocharged. SAE 10W-40, API SJ/CF, ACEA A3/B3. Product data sheet for Castrol Magnatec

mobil1.jpg (3386 bytes)

cost: just gone up to $60

 

 

Mobil 1 5W-50 is fancier than the blended 10W-30 Mobil 1 and not as dear as the top shelf 0W-40 Mobil 1. Not all Mobil 1's are the same! I am trying the 5W-50. Mobil recommend using Super XHP for the 90-97 V8 and Mobil Super GF-2 10W-30 or Mobil 1 5W-50 for the later model VVTi V8. The US market is different - different range of oils - no 5W-50 for example.

Mobil v 5W-50 is the ultimate performance, fully synthetic race proven engine oil designed to provide unsurpassed protection for the engines of all petrol, LPG and diesel powered passenger cars, light trucks, 4WD's and vans. Mobil v 5W-50 is particularly suitable for high performance engines, especially those fitted with turbochargers, operating under the most severe conditions. This oil is formulated from wax-free synthesised hydrocarbons and a unique, proprietary additive system to provide exceptional thermal and oxidation stability. This, together with it's naturally high resistance to viscosity change with temperature, ensures that full protection is maintained at temperatures at which other oils begin to oxidise, degrade and thicken.

 

ULX200.gif (19376 bytes)

Cost: about $55

http://www.ulx110.com/Bullets.html

 

Wow! - this oil comes with some great claims! More power than Mobil 1, better than any whimpy full synthetic oil etc - sounds great! Aaron and I did dyno my car before and after with Mobil 1 and ULX-110 - no power gains - but the ULX was a 10W versus the 5000 km old 5W Mobil - the dyno graphs looked the same. No power gain for Amsoil over Mobil 1 either - we did it in Aarons car.

So no power gain in my car, didn't measure compression or oil pressure, fuel economy wasn't measured accurately to tell if there was any difference. But a sample is in the lab so lets so how the engine and component life claim makes out for my V8.

 

helixultra5l_5w_130.jpg (6752 bytes)

about $45

I wanted full syn for the Phillip Island Race meet so I have used Shell Ultra - cheaper than Mobil 1, $45 versus $60

A premium grade, fully synthetic engine oil scientifically formulated to provide the ultimate protection for prestige and high performance vehicles. Shell Helix Ultra is recommended by Ferrari and is used by Dick Johnson for the Shell Helix Racing Team. Available in 1 litre and 5 litre.

I usually drain the oil for at least an hour with the jack on the battery side of the car so that all the old oil drains out of the drain plug on the throttle side. The whole car is tilted sideways to encourage all the old oil out of the drain plug. All the oil won't drain out on a level surface. I've had the oil flow from the drain plug stop with the car on a level surface, then jacked up the battery side of the car and the oil starts draining again..

Amsoil always get good wraps in tests - it's one of the few oils I've never heard a bad thing about - it seems to win all the magazine comparisons and get glowing reviews everywhere. Hard to separate the infomercial style of "news" and testimonial type from the real scientific tests. I might try Mobil 1 next and then some Amsoil - but that will be some 6 months away. So we need a DieHard out there to try it too. So if you can get an oil analysis done before and after, a dyno before and after would be nice too, and do a genuine oil filter change too then go for it and send me the results. Here is a collection of some Amsoil links:

http://www.onvic.com.au/motoring/magazine/oil/index.htm Very interesting reading - don't know the background of the author or if it is a genuine test or some infomercial style of presentation. I haven't seen any viscosity loss in my oil tests yet.

http://www.amsoil.com/ Amsoil corporate site. Amsoil recommend changing the filter more often than the oil.

Amsoil magazine test This is a Fast Fours and Rotors magazine article - the link went dead so this is the cached copy I saved when it was live.

http://www.whitepages.com.au/wp/ Type Amsoil in the white pages to find someone who sells it near you.

The following are all AutoSpeed links - great reading:

All serious users of lubricating oils - from race teams to industry - use oil analysis to indicate the health of both the oil and the system that's being lubricated. Having an oil analysis performed is also quite cheap - but how are the results of that testing to be interpreted?
Oil Analysis Part 1

Last week we looked at interpreting the results gained by analysing oil with ICP Spectroscopy, while this week we move onto Particle Quantification Index (PQI), Viscosity measurement, and testing for the presence of water.

Oil Analysis Part 2

Oil classifications either describe viscosity or performance. When purchasing a can, drum or tankerful of oil, it is important to realise that a number of international classification systems are used to describe the product and its uses. The classifications, which include ISO, SAE, API, CCMC, SABS ...

Reading Oil Specs Part 1

Is One Oil Better Than Another? In last week's story, the focus was on the viscosity classification systems of lubricants, namely the International Standards Organization (ISO) system for industrial lubricants and the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) system for automotive oils. This article will ...

Reading Oil Specs Part 2

-for-life components or extended overhaul periods. In these cases the equipment has exceeded the performance capabilities of conventional mineral oil based lubricants, and created the need to develop synthetic oils. This article provides an introduction to the wide-ranging topic of synthetic oil and ...

Synthetic Oils

But wait there's more!

 

More Than You Ever Wanted to Know About Motor Oil

by Ed Hackett http://rconcepts.com/beard/dragnet/drag/oilinfo.html

I think this site is informative and balanced. Good stuff.

 

http://www.fernblatt.com/longhurst/engineoil_bible.html

Lots of good information here too - let down a couple of times by some subjective statements like:

"Synthetic oils have been known to dislodge the baked-on deposits from mineral oils and leave them floating around your engine "

and

"If you've been running around on synthetic, don't change down to a mineral-based oil - your engine might not be able to cope with the degradation in lubrication"

These type of statements would never make it in AutoSpeed.

 

Zoom magazine No 25. page 76.

A 5000 km old AU Ford Falcon 6 cylinder car had the oil changed and the standard Motorcraft filter removed and cut open. The filter was blocked and the oil was filthy. Sure you can make Ford jokes but the thrust of the story was that even on a brand new car (worse because everything is bedding in? - with my brand new Statesman SuperCharged I had a couple of years ago there was an optional oil change for the 1500 km service - I took it) the oil and filter needed changing. Then their was some anecdotal stories of other "experienced people" who agreed that in a car with over 50 000 km, chances are the oil filter is in bypass mode (i.e. clogged) after 3000 km. So the moral of this story was change the filter every 5000 km regardless.

 

SDHsig.gif (4600 bytes)